Posts tagged ‘Zimbabwe’

Seminar: Political Accidents & Unfinished Death in Zimbabwe by Joost Fontein, Jan. 13 2017 @ BIEA

political-accidents-in-zimbabwe
Date: January 13, 2017
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa Nairobi
Time: 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

http://www.biea.ac.uk/event/political-accidents-and-unfinished-death-in-zimbabwe/

January 7, 2017 at 6:35 pm Leave a comment

Exhibition: Paint & Metal by Mary Ogembo & Dickens Otieno, Dec. 10 2016 – Jan. 14 2017 @ Creativity Gallery – National Museum

mary-ogembo-at-nmk
Dates: December 10, 2016 to January 14, 2017
Venue: Creativity Gallery, National Museum
Time: Open Daily; 8.30 am – 5.30 pm
Museum Rates Apply

About
Mary Ogembo’s paintings are rich with vibrant Earth colors that bring about the state of the African environment. She is inspired by the African woman and applies unconventional, engaging and fun concepts that overlook the negative stereotype placed on the African woman.

Ogembo is a kenyan born artist who has been working as a full time artist since 1998. She is currently based at the GoDown Arts centre in Nairobi. 2005, she won commonwealth arts and craft award, worked in Ghana as a resident artist for a period of six months at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. Her work has been widely recognized by local media in Kenya and other countries including, South African broadcasting cooperation, Featuring Africa Within, CNN Inside Africa 2011 and others.

Collected by: The National Art Gallery of Zimbabwe, The Standard Chartered bank UK and Casoria museum in Italy have collected her work.

Exhibitions: Kenya, France, USA, Egypt, Canada, Finland, Zimbabwe, Ghana, Tanzania, Zambia, India, Germany, Lithuania and Abu Dhabi.
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Dickens George Otieno’s (B.1979) practice is driven by the search to find meaning and worth in things that seem otherwise useless. Otieno weaves large sculptural fabrics and makes cloth sculpture from discarded drink cans which he collects from local kiosks near his home and studio. He compares the shredded cans to palm leaves which have been used traditionally for weaving through many generations and civilizations.

Clothing is important because apart from covering the body, it is also a statement about the person through the different designs of color, material and even the patterns printed on them which reflects the time and the world today.

Works at: The GoDown Art Centre in Nairobi, Kenya

Selected Exhibitions: Amsterdam art fair(2016), UN.FORM/MULTI.FORM(2016), Kenya Art FAIR (2016), Circle Modern and Contemporary East African Art Auction(2015), solo exhibitions at Nafasi Art Centre-Dar es Saalam(2015), Emerson Hurumizi Zanzibar(2015) and Manjano(2011)
His work is represented in various private collections

December 8, 2016 at 9:47 am Leave a comment

Out of Town/Concert: Oliver Mtukudzi in Kisumu ft. Suzanna Owiyo, Sept. 17 2016 @ Acacia Premier Hotel – Kisumu

oliver-mtukudzi
Date: September 17, 2016
Venue: Acacia Premier Hotel, Kisumu
Time: 8 pm
Tickets: KES 3,000

September 13, 2016 at 1:34 pm Leave a comment

Public Discussion With Raphael Chikukwa, Jul.15 2016 @ Goethe Institut Auditorium

Public Talk with Raphael
Date: July 15, 2016
Venue: Goethe Institut Auditorium
Time: 6 pm
Entry: Free

About
Raphael was born in Zimbabwe and has worked mainly as an independent curator for more than ten years before joining the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in 2010 as its Chief Curator. He is the founding curator of the 1st Zimbabwe Pavilion in 2011 and also curated the Zimbabwe Pavilion 2013 and 2015 at the Venice Biennale. Raphael was awarded the 2006 – 2007 Chevening Scholar and now holds an MA Curating Contemporary Design from Kingston University London.Raphael will give a talk on his work and experiences.

July 11, 2016 at 5:04 pm Leave a comment

Sunday Salon New York City – Nairobi – Chicago, Jun. 29 2014 @ Louis Leakey Auditorium

Kwani-sunday-salon-29th-June-online
Date: Sunday, June 29 2014
Venue: Kwani Trust Office – Chiromo
Time: 3 pm
Entry: Free

Join Kwani? Trust for a special edition of Sunday Salon featuring writers from Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, South Africa and Zimbabwe.

Is it prize season, you ask? Yes it is!

Winner of Kwani Trust’s Manuscript Prize and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Jennifer Makumbi, reads from her just-launched novel, Kintu, published by Kwani?

The Shortlisted Writers of the 2013 Etisalat Prize for Literature – Yewande Omotoso, author of Bom Boy, Karen Jennings, author of Finding Soutbek and the overall winner, NoViolet Bulawayo, author of We Need New Names, read from their work.

Kwani? Trust sends off the two Kenyan writers shortlisted for The Caine Prize for African Writing 2014; Billy Kahora and Okwiri Oduor, with readings from their nominated stories ahead of the announcement of the overall winner in Oxford in July.

Live music by KIU

Find more info here

June 21, 2014 at 4:42 pm 2 comments

BIEA Seminar: Rain, Power, Sovereignty & The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe, Apr. 16 2014 @ BIEA / IFRA

Rain, Power, Sovereignty and The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe

Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Time: 11.00 am
Entry: Prior RSVP. For more information please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or call +254 735 260 004

Seminar by: Joost Fontein, University of Edinburgh
Chair: Sinoxolo Neo Musangi, British Institute in Eastern Africa

Abstract
In 2010 a government meteorologist revealed that for much of the last decade, the Zimbabwean weather forecast had been censored on a daily basis by agents of the President’s Office. ‘This information’ he said ‘was seen as sensitive’. What this ‘sensitivity’ amounts to is the subject of this paper. It is hard to make sense of the government’s impulse to censor the weather forecast in the 2000s without reference to the localized re-configurations of authority over land and ‘re-making’ of the state that fast track land reform provoked. To the extent that fast track offered new opportunities for the realization of a diversity of localised aspirations and imagined futures that turned on access to land and fertile soils in divergent ways, the recurrent droughts and failing harvests of the early 2000s were politically significant because they called into question the legitimacy of land reform, and the broader ‘thirdchimurenga’ project constituted around it. But across Zimbabwe, and the region, rainfall and drought have long been measures of contested political legitimacy in more complex ways not limited to the politics of food, famine and agricultural production. In southern Zimbabwe, this is true not just for spirit mediums, chiefs and other ‘traditionalist’ authorities for whom rainmaking practices are well-established means of demonstrating ‘autochthony’, sovereignty and legitimacy, but also for war veterans, new farmers, government technocrats and others involved in land reform during the 2000s. This is what I examine here. Whilst I focus particularly on rainmaking practices, encounters with njuzu water spirits, and national biras that took place in the 2005-6 when research was carried out, the larger point I pursue is that water acts as an index of power – of the entangled but contested play of legitimacy and sovereignty – across many different registers of meaning and regimes of rule. In making this argument I engage with Keane (2003; 2005) and Engelke’s elaboration of Peirce’s theory of signs (1955), and build upon others (James 1972; Jedrej 1992) who have long argued that rainmaking ‘traditions’ across eastern, central and southern Africa are less a form of applied meteorology and more an idiom of politics and power, in order to argue that they are necessarily both at the same time.

April 12, 2014 at 2:42 pm Leave a comment

Exhibition: Témoin/Witness, Dec. 13 2013 – Jan. 10 2014 @ Goethe Institut

witness
Opening Date: Friday, December 13 2013, 7 pm

Exhibition Dates: Monday to Friday, December 16-20 2013, January 2-10 2014,
Time: 1 to 6 pm
Entry: Free

Témoin/Witness is an exhibition initiated by the Goethe- Institut South Africa and curator Simon Njami; co-curated by Sammy Baloji and Monique Pelser. It showcases the works of photographers who were involved in a Photographers’ Portfolio Meeting over a span of three years. The aim was to present their work within the portfolio reviews to several curators to gain critical feedback. The photographers included Sammy Baloji (DRC), Calvin Dondo (Zimbabwe), Sabelo Mlangeni (South Africa), Abraham Oghobase (Nigeria), Monique Pelser (South Africa) and Michael Tsegaye (Ethiopia).

The exhibition speaks about the social issues, ever-changing past and present and inherited cultures across the African continent. It represents how this group of emerging photographers perform the role of onlookers, and actively survey their immedate environments. The works then become historical records and evidence reflecting the constantly shifting history, inherit cultures and social issues that span across the African continent.

About the Photographers

Sammy Baloji
Sammy Baloji, born 1978 in Lubumbashi, D.R.C, lives and works in Lubumbashi and Brussels, Belgium.

“My work questions the still existing traces of colonization in Congolese society. In this approach, it expresses a desire to inform and rewrite a story from the present. A present aware of his past and ready to assume the future. My photographic work is between documentary and fiction. In this sense I need a context (the environment) to create my own story. To do this, I did some research on topics or events of the past and even on the present. I’m using pictures archives or even sound archives to create a new statement.”

Calvin Dondo
Calvin Dondo, born 1963 in Harare, lives and works in Harare, Zimbabwe.

“I believe our work as an artist is to open doors, shed light and give new possibilities to, first, our immediate environment, and then, the world at large. Our visual statements provoke and shift societies understanding of the world. Whatever work I do I feel I am responsible to everyone around me.”

Sabelo Mlangeni
Sabelo Mlangeni, born 1980 in Driefontein, lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa.

“My work challenges a viewer, like in this body of work ‘Country Girls’. In our society we are taught that a man should present himself in a certain way, seeing a man in a dress shifts the way we think and are taught to think. It is political and confronts issues of homophobia.”

Abraham Oghobase
Abraham Oghobase, born 1979 in Lagos, lives and works in Lagos, Nigeria.

“The social, political and economic situation of society plays a pivotal role in my work. I am interested in using photography to explore the way people live and how they are affected by the different systems that exist, and how conditions evolve to meet or take advantage of certain needs. For example, with this series ‘Jam I’ explore how rural-urban drift, among other things, has led to inflated rents in Lagos and congested living spaces. My exploration of identity through self-portraiture in Nigeria and abroad, for example, is often a function of how I am perceived as a photographer, an artist, a black male, a Nigerian, and so on, which in turn is based on social and cultural points of view that have their roots in history.”

Monique Pelser
Monique Pelser, born 1976 in Johannesburg, lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

“I try to use the camera and developing photographic technology as a way of re-looking at my country, the land, people and the objects or traces which were left behind and have become a historical burden. I feel that my generation and those that follow have inherited a lot to process. I try to use photography as dissonance, as a way to re-look and represent and process this history.”

Michael Tsegaye
Michael Tsegaye, born 1975 in Addis Ababa, lives and works in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“In the past ten years, the city in which I live, Addis Ababa, and the rest of Ethiopia has gone through tremendous changes – both demographically as well as physically – with the construction of new buildings and the demolition of the old ones. The changes that modernity has brought about in the rural areas are also quite significant, as old cultural practices adopt certain aspects of new ones.”

December 11, 2013 at 9:37 am Leave a comment

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