Posts tagged ‘Kileleshwa’

Exhibition: Turkana Through Time, Jul. 23 2016 @ BIEA Seminar Room

Turkana Through Time
Open to Public from 23rd of July 2016
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa

About
This exhibition by Samuel Derbyshire in collaboration with the Pit Rivers Museum, Oxford, showcases a selection of historical photographs taken in Turkana at various different times throughout the last century. Prints of these historical photographs were recently brought back to southern Turkana as part of a visual repatriation project, where they were used in interviews and group discussion sessions to explore the recent history of the region at various different locations.

The exhibition also encompasses photographs taken during this recent project, showing the historical photographs being discussed by the friends and relatives of the people they contain.

July 20, 2016 at 1:36 pm Leave a comment

Presentation: They Go Out To Be Seen – Recognition and Place-Making in Johannesburg Nightclubs, Jul. 19 2016 @ BIEA

They Go Out to be Seen
Presentation by Beth Vale:They Go Out To Be Seen – Recognition and Place-Making in Johannesburg Nightclubs

Date: 19 July 2016
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Urban studies have given increasing attention to the everyday life of cities – the daily activities that constitute and re-imagine urban space. Yet surprisingly little consideration has been given to their every night life: the spatial tactics and creative insurgencies of urban residents after dark. Where authors have attended to the nocturnal city, those focused on ‘pleasure’ have often negated the subtle politics of nigh-time play, embedded in expressions of identity, attachment and resistance.

This paper investigates Johannesburg nightclubs as sites of quotidian political activity, through which young people contest social space and their place in it, thereby contributing to the city’s affective and socio-political cartography…

Read more, here

July 16, 2016 at 5:04 pm Leave a comment

Famine in Somalia: A Rift Valley Forum Meeting, Mar. 22 2016 @ RVI Office – Kileleshwa

Launch of Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures, 2011-12

Date: March 22, 2016
Venue: Rift Valley Institute Office, Seminar Room
Time: 2-4 pm
Entry: Prior Reservation, RSVP here

About
In 2011, the scale of famine taking grip in Somalia was just beginning to receive international attention. Although famine had been predicted almost a year earlier, it was not until July that famine was formally declared. Some 250,000 people died in the southern Somalia in the famine, which also displaced and destroyed the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of others, many of whom sought refuge in Kenya.

On Tuesday 22 March 2016, the Rift Valley Forum will host the Nairobi launch of Famine in Somalia: Competing Imperatives, Collective Failures, 2011-12. This new book by Dan Maxwell and Nisar Majid is based on extensive research in Somalia and the region. It examines the causes of the famine, the trade-offs between competing policy priorities that led to it, the collective failure in response, and how those affected by it attempted to protect themselves and their livelihoods. Its analysis of the humanitarian response, includes the role played by Turkey, the Middle East, and Islamic charities worldwide — actors that had not previously been particularly visible in Somalia.

Copies of the book will be on sale during the Forum.

More information on the book can be found here.

March 17, 2016 at 2:40 pm Leave a comment

Panel Discussion: Development and Aid in Africa, Dec. 14 2015 @ BIEA – Nairobi

Development and Aid In Africa
Date: December 14, 2015
Venue: BIEA, Nairobi
Time: 2 pm
Entry: Free

December 6, 2015 at 4:32 pm 2 comments

Event: Mobility Patterns and the Inception of Herding Economies in Kenya – Insights from Lake Turkana Basin, Dec. 8 2015 @ BIEA

Mobility Patterns
Mobility Patterns and the Inception of Herding Economies in Kenya: Insights from Lake Turkana Basin by Dr. Emmanuel K Ndiema.

Date: December 8, 2015
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room, Laikpia road, Kileleshwa
Time: 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

December 6, 2015 at 4:18 pm Leave a comment

State, Economy & Society: Reflections on Constitutions in Africa By Professor Yash Pal Ghai, Nov. 5 2015 @ BIEA

State of the Economy
Date: 5 November 2015
Venue: BIEA Seminar room, Laikipia road, Kileleshwa
Time: 6:00pm-8:00pm

Since the beginning of colonialism in the early 19th century, African states have experienced a large number of constitutions, in both the colonial and post-independence periods. Each constitution has expressed the exigencies and expectations of the moment; some have been imposed, others the decisions of the people. If we regard the primary purpose of a constitution to promote constitutionalism, most constitutions have been failures. Using social science concepts of state, economy and society, Ghai explains the causes of the failure of constitutionalism…

November 2, 2015 at 11:13 am Leave a comment

BIEA Annual PhD Conference: Centres and Peripheries – Rethinking binaries in Kenya & East Africa, Oct. 31 2015 @ BIEA

Date: October 31, 2015
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Location: http://www.biea.ac.uk/find-us/
Entrance: Free

About
Scholarship on Africa in the social sciences and humanities has long wrestled with the distinction between centre and periphery, across diverse contexts and historical periods. Whether applied to the broad conceptualisation of the ‘Global South’s’ place in a capitalist world order, or the relationship between African cities and their rural environs, or the significance of what Murray Last and others termed ‘deep rurals’ for a myriad of pre-colonial political orders, trade routes and state systems across the wider region, centre-periphery tensions and confluences have long been a powerful problematic underlying African studies.

Increasing recognition of the historical, social, cultural and political significance of the shifting realities of life across sub-Saharan Africa, the mobility of migrants, and the waxing and waning spread of ideas, religious movements and different forms of political organisation and sociality, has provoked social scientists, historians and archaeologists to look beyond static models of social life in order to understand regional connections, power fluctuations and mutating political thought in Kenya, eastern Africa and beyond. Yet within this broader re-focusing of attention upon ‘trans-regional’ flows, connections and mobilities, ‘centre and periphery’ tensions have shown little sign of going away any time soon. Recent critical theory has framed ‘Africa’ – too often still re-imagined as an undifferentiated whole – as a (peripheral) zone of experimentation for neo-liberal forms of statecraft. In Kenya, in particular, the reality of a new constitution and devolved political structure has revived older discussions of ‘centre and periphery’ in academic and other spaces. Similarly, studies of urban social movements and state power continue to find in notions of ‘centre and periphery’ a model to think through competing forms of protest and governance in Kenya, the region and the wider continent.

If ‘centres and peripheries’ have found new political and social salience in Kenya, and across eastern Africa, through a new politics of constitutionalism and devolution, as well as in activist and protest contexts, they have also had an energising and constraining influence on the process of doing research. What and where is ‘the field’ in which the researcher ‘works’? For what reasons and how are particular ‘sites’ identified and chosen? How does the researcher get there? For whom does the researcher research/write? And to what extent are researchers complicit in the reification of particular boundaries through which specific ‘centres’ and peripheries’ are constantly being reconstituted. These questions are pertinent to anyone who does research in East Africa, concerning as it does, town and country, home and away.

The forthcoming PhD conference will offer emerging research scholars and PhD candidates working in Kenya and East Africa an opportunity to re-consider the legacy, significance and use of notions of ‘centre-periphery’ as they relate to their research. We welcome submissions across a range of disciplines and themes, including, but not limited to: Archaeology, History, Anthropology, Sociology, Political Science, Geography, Literary, linguistic and Cultural studies.

October 27, 2015 at 11:23 am Leave a comment

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