Posts tagged ‘Docubox’

Film Pre-Screening: Thank You For the Rain, Mar. 27 2017 @ Rift Valley Institute – Seminar Room


On 27 March 2017, the Rift Valley Forum will host a pre-screening of the film Thank You For the Rain by Kenyan farmer Kisilu Musya and Norwegian filmmaker Julia Dahr.

Date: March 27, 2017
Venue: BIEA, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 2 – 4pm
Entry: Prior Registration – registration link

About
Thank You For the Rain, which premiered at the Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival, documents Kisilu’s life as a farmer and the impact of climate change on his family and his village over the past five years. Besides showing the natural impact of floods, droughts and storms, the film also shows the human cost for Kisilu’s children and wife. When his house is destroyed by a storm, the self-taught filmmaker starts a farmers’ movement and calls for action against the extreme consequences of the weather.

Kisilu makes it far in his struggle—all the way to Oslo and the COP21 in Paris—but the further Kisilu gets into the world of global politics, the more resistance, bureaucracy and arrogance he faces.

A panel discussion to reflect on the film and address the drought crisis in the region will follow the screening.

Moderator: Peter Mudamba – Docubox
Discussants: Kisilu Musya – Filmmaker, Wanjira Mathai (TBC) – Wangari Maathai Institute (WMI), Oyunga Pala

March 24, 2017 at 10:30 am Leave a comment

Screening: God Loves Uganda, Aug. 26 2015 @ Mageuzi Hall – Pawa 254 Hub

God Loves Uganda

Docubox, in partnership with PAWA 254, will screen, God Loves Uganda, on Wednesday August 26 2015 at Mageuzi hall from 6.00pm sharp.

Entrance is absolutely FREE.

August 13, 2015 at 3:26 pm Leave a comment

[Postponed to Next Year] Screening: The Ambassador by Mads Brugger, Oct. 31 2014 @ Docubox Offices

Screening: The Ambassador by Mads Brugger

Screening: The Ambassador by Mads Brugger


Date: October 31, 2014 [Postponed to Next Year]
Venue: Docubox Offices
Time: 6.30-8.30 pm

About
In his new stunt documentary, “The Ambassador,” the Danish journalist and filmmaker Mads Brugger impersonates a European adventurer seeking his fortune in Africa. This character, named Mads Cortzen, might have been dreamed up by Joseph Conrad in collaboration with Sacha Baron Cohen. A slender, dapper fellow with a ginger beard and an ironical manner, Cortzen motors around Liberia and the Central African Republic in a flag-festooned Volvo, handing out bribes and secretly recording his meetings with government ministers, diamond mine owners and shady passport brokers. Mr. Brugger’s voice-over briskly explains the rules and risks associated with his imposture, and reveals a world in which everything seems to be for sale. His first purchase is a Liberian diplomatic credential, which he thinks will allow him to operate in the Central African Republic with impunity as he buys conflict gems and sets up a match factory. Nothing is quite as simple as it seems. A Dutch fixer and Liberian officials, in spite of thousands of dollars in fees and “donations,” cannot put his papers in order, placing him at risk of arrest or worse. His Central African partners might be ripping him off, and it becomes hard to tell if Cortzen is master of the mock-diplomatic game or the world’s biggest sucker.

It is also sometimes difficult to read Mr. Brugger’s intentions. “The Ambassador” is both a satire of European cynicism and an exposé of African corruption, but a crucial element of social or ethical concern is missing. There is, for example, no sense of the toll that venal governments and abusive business practices exact on ordinary Africans, and the arrogant contempt that his alter ego shows for the Central African Republic and its people sometimes seems to belong to Mr. Brugger as well.

But much of what he was able to record — the deadpan viciousness of a French mercenary in charge of state security; the casual greed of fellow diplomats; the pomposity and duplicity of local bureaucrats — is genuinely appalling. Mr. Brugger’s portrait of shameless, routine collusion between exploitative foreigners and dysfunctional dictatorships is depressing and undeniable.

Unless, that is, “The Ambassador” is even more of a hoax than it seems to be. This strikes me as plausible, since somebody having this much fun in such proximity to horror may not be completely trustworthy. Via http://www.nytimes.com/


Find more info. here

October 12, 2014 at 6:02 pm Leave a comment

Celebrating Documentary Film: Docubox Open Day, Jul. 27 2014 @ Michael Joseph Centre – Safaricom House

Docubox
Find more info here

July 25, 2014 at 8:34 am Leave a comment


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