Posts filed under ‘seminar’

Nairobi Seminar Series: #Burundi2015 – The Crisis is Now, Aug. 27 2015 @ BIEA Seminar Room

Burundi 2015
Date: August 27, 2015
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room
Time: 11 am – 12.30 pm

http://www.biea.ac.uk/event/burundi2015-the-crisis-is-now/

August 22, 2015 at 2:26 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Imagining Social Justice – Images of Obama, Culture & Human Rights in Kenya, Jul. 23 2015 @ BIEA

Nairobi Seminar Series
Imagining Social Justice: Images of Obama, Culture & Human Rights in Kenya presentation by Steve Ouma Akoth

Date: July 23, 2015
Venue: BIEA, Laikipia road Seminar Room
Time: 11.00 am – 12.30pm
Entry: Prior RSVP

About
This project reveals how notions of inclusion and exclusion are mediated through the images of Barack Obama and the politics of patronage in K’Ogelo, Siaya County. It examines the happenings in K’Ogelo after Barack Obama becomes president of the United States as an illustration of how culture and patronage tend to be appropriated in contemporary Kenya to define the meanings and frame the subject of human rights. The Book project explores various spaces and conjunctures where the images of Obama continue to be used in K’Ogelo and among other actors who live on the social margins of Kenya’s cities to give a cogent and systematic reading of both the cultural context and human behavior.

Find more information here

July 13, 2015 at 3:17 pm Leave a comment

IFRA Seminar: Beyond Sex & Money – Thinking Culture In Afro-European Intimacies, Jun. 16 2015 @ IFRA/BIEA

by Dr. Altaïr Després – Univerity Paris 1 Sorbonne

Date: June 16, 2015
Venue: IFRA
Time: 11 am
Entry: Prior RSVP – at: seminars@ifra-nairobi.net

Abstract
Focusing on the case of Western women travelling to Zanzibar, this paper seeks to explore how sexual intimacy with indigenous men can be a space for cultural transactions. While the economic issue is currently at the heart of the anthropological and sociological understanding of “transactional sex” or “sex-tourism” in Africa, little consideration is given to the role of symbolic and cultural resources in the economy of transnational sexuality and desire.
My hypothesis is that in a globalized sexual market not only do cultural stereotypes shape desire (intimate tourist encounters sometimes originate in racial stereotypes about the sexual performances of African men for example), but sexuality can also be a means to access cultural resources. By focusing on cultural transactions, the paper examines how, on the one hand, Western women engaged in intimate relations with African men discover local practices which are less accessible from ordinary tourist circuits, as their African boyfriends play the role of “cultural brokers” and teach them about local customs. On the other hand, this paper analyses to what extent, through intimacy, Western women also act as brokers, mobilizing their (cultural) skills for their partner by teaching him a foreign language or using their knowledge to formalize a business.

June 12, 2015 at 1:55 pm 1 comment

Seminar: Gendered Citizenship, Politics and Public Spaces in Kenya, Sept. 23 2014 @ BIEA, Laikipia Rd

Gendered Citizenship, Politics and Public Spaces in Kenya By Christina Kenny, PhD Candidate, Australian National University
Date: Tuesday, 23 September 2014
Time: 11.00 am
Venue: BIEA, Laikipia Rd, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Entry: RSVP at seminars@biea.ac.uk

Abstract:
Shortly after the 2013 general elections, the newly elected women’s representative for Nairobi county, Rachel Shebesh was slapped by the Governor of Nairobi Evans Kidero at his offices in front of a crowd of Kenyan reporters.

The new Kenyan constitution provides for women’s civil and political rights through a variety of innovative mechanisms, but in the months leading up to the 2013 elections, most Kenyan women did not seem to have a good understanding of the laws which are designed to protect women’s rights. Although the constitution had been in place for almost two years, the women I spoke to could only talk vaguely about the content of their constitutional rights. Against the recent focus on women’s representation in Kenyan politics, my doctoral thesis, “We’ve agreed to be ruled”: Women’s public and private decision making in modern Kenya, examines the regulatory and interpersonal dynamics which drive women’s choices and behaviours, in both private and public spaces, with a dual focus on sex and sexuality rights, and civil and political rights. I employ an interdisciplinary approach – utilising cultural anthropology, history and law.

I examine the experiences of women entering politics and public space through a feminist lens. Through case studies drawn from the last two general elections, I interrogate the imperatives of international human rights discourse, and the demands such discourse places on its subjects.

About
Christina Kenny holds a Bachelor of Arts (English Literature, Early Modern History; Hons. I) and a Bachelor of Laws both from the University of Sydney, and is admitted as a solicitor in the Supreme Court of NSW. She is currently PhD Scholar at the School of International, Political and Strategic Studies, at the Australian National University. She began her career as a policy officer with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice team at the Australian Human Rights Commission and has since worked for the Australian Government for the Refugee Review Tribunal, and the Attorney General’s Department, the Women’s Legal Centre in Cape Town, the South African Human Rights Commission, and the Kenyan Human Rights Commission.

For more information and to RSVP please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk

September 18, 2014 at 4:58 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom to Govern in the UK, Jun. 11 2014 @ BIEA/IFRA

Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom To Govern In The UK – By Professor Sir Jeffrey Jowell KCMG QC Director, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law

Date: June 11, 2014
Venue: BIEA/IFRA
Entry: Prior Reservation [RSVP on seminars@biea.ac.uk]

About

Sir Jeffrey Jowell QC is Professor of Law and was the Dean of UCL’s Faculty of Laws and Head of its Law Department between 1998-2000 and again from 1982-1989. From 1994 to 1999 he was Vice Provost of UCL. He was was knighted in 2011 (KCMG) for services to human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe.

The scope of Professor Jowell’s work includes judicial review, human rights and planning. He advises extensively on the drafting of national constitutions, the relationship between the UK and dependent territories, and the design and application of internal regulatory and Ombudsmen schemes. His authority as an academic commentator is reflected in many citations to his work in the judgements of courts in this country and abroad.

June 7, 2014 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

IFRA Seminar: 50 Years after Independence – The Nations in East Africa. Revisiting Nation-Building between Particularism & Universalism? Jun. 12-13 2014 @ IFRA/BIEA

Dates: June 12 & 13, 2014
Venue: IFRA/BIEA
Entry: Prior Reservation [RSVP on seminars@ifra-nairobi.net]

Academic guest of honour, Prof. Bethwell Ogot, Chancellor of Maseno University: The Kenyan Nation, and the Historiography of Nationalism

Sessions & Time
Session 1: 9.00AM
Return on national construction in East Africa: long-term national building and high culture
Chairman, Prof. H. Mwanzi, Kenyatta University.
– Ephraim Wahome (University of Nairobi), Susan Mwangi (Kenyatta University) & Mildred Ndeda (JOUST): The origins of Kenya and the birth of the independent Kenya.
– Marie-Aude Fouéré (IFRA-Nairobi): Nation-building in Tanzania, political culture, and socialist irredentism.
– Steve Omondi (Pwani University): Languages, “high culture” and the construction of the Nation.
Discussant/Moderator: Christian Thibon (IFRA-Nairobi): The long duration (longue durée) of orphan and plural constructions.

Session 2: 2.00PM
Living together (I): the way from the top, the new challenges – federalism, decentralization and regional integration.
Chairman prof H. Muriuki, UoN
– Felix Kiruthu (Kenyatta University), Francois. Muchoki (CUEA):Federalism, majimbo and Kenyan decentralization-devolution under the nation-state by construction
– Mohammed Bakari (University of Dar es Salaam): Racial identities, citizenship and the politics of nationalism in Zanzibar
– Wanyama Masinde (Catholic University in Eastern Africa):Regional integration as a response policy for the national challenge?
Discussant/Moderator: Etienne Smith (Science Po Paris, France): Revisiting state-building, a comparative approach.

Session 3 (13th June 2014, 9.00AM – 1.00PM)
Living together (2): routes down, negotiating identities – “little homelands”, “small nations” and “moral ethnicity”.
Chairman, Prof V G Simiyu, UoN Jean-François Chanet (Science Po Paris, France): “Little homelands” (petites patries) in France, and the concept of ‘sociability’.
– Justin Willis (Durham University, UK): “Moral ethnicity” to the Kenya, or the construction of a civic and moral sense out of the state?
Discussant/Moderator: Pius Kakai (Kenyatta University), Mutuma Ruteere (CHRIPS).

June 7, 2014 at 2:58 pm Leave a comment

BIEA Seminar: Rain, Power, Sovereignty & The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe, Apr. 16 2014 @ BIEA / IFRA

Rain, Power, Sovereignty and The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe

Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Time: 11.00 am
Entry: Prior RSVP. For more information please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or call +254 735 260 004

Seminar by: Joost Fontein, University of Edinburgh
Chair: Sinoxolo Neo Musangi, British Institute in Eastern Africa

Abstract
In 2010 a government meteorologist revealed that for much of the last decade, the Zimbabwean weather forecast had been censored on a daily basis by agents of the President’s Office. ‘This information’ he said ‘was seen as sensitive’. What this ‘sensitivity’ amounts to is the subject of this paper. It is hard to make sense of the government’s impulse to censor the weather forecast in the 2000s without reference to the localized re-configurations of authority over land and ‘re-making’ of the state that fast track land reform provoked. To the extent that fast track offered new opportunities for the realization of a diversity of localised aspirations and imagined futures that turned on access to land and fertile soils in divergent ways, the recurrent droughts and failing harvests of the early 2000s were politically significant because they called into question the legitimacy of land reform, and the broader ‘thirdchimurenga’ project constituted around it. But across Zimbabwe, and the region, rainfall and drought have long been measures of contested political legitimacy in more complex ways not limited to the politics of food, famine and agricultural production. In southern Zimbabwe, this is true not just for spirit mediums, chiefs and other ‘traditionalist’ authorities for whom rainmaking practices are well-established means of demonstrating ‘autochthony’, sovereignty and legitimacy, but also for war veterans, new farmers, government technocrats and others involved in land reform during the 2000s. This is what I examine here. Whilst I focus particularly on rainmaking practices, encounters with njuzu water spirits, and national biras that took place in the 2005-6 when research was carried out, the larger point I pursue is that water acts as an index of power – of the entangled but contested play of legitimacy and sovereignty – across many different registers of meaning and regimes of rule. In making this argument I engage with Keane (2003; 2005) and Engelke’s elaboration of Peirce’s theory of signs (1955), and build upon others (James 1972; Jedrej 1992) who have long argued that rainmaking ‘traditions’ across eastern, central and southern Africa are less a form of applied meteorology and more an idiom of politics and power, in order to argue that they are necessarily both at the same time.

April 12, 2014 at 2:42 pm Leave a comment

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