Posts tagged ‘Zimbabwe’

Sunday Salon New York City – Nairobi – Chicago, Jun. 29 2014 @ Louis Leakey Auditorium

Kwani-sunday-salon-29th-June-online
Date: Sunday, June 29 2014
Venue: Kwani Trust Office – Chiromo
Time: 3 pm
Entry: Free

Join Kwani? Trust for a special edition of Sunday Salon featuring writers from Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, South Africa and Zimbabwe.

Is it prize season, you ask? Yes it is!

Winner of Kwani Trust’s Manuscript Prize and the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize Jennifer Makumbi, reads from her just-launched novel, Kintu, published by Kwani?

The Shortlisted Writers of the 2013 Etisalat Prize for Literature – Yewande Omotoso, author of Bom Boy, Karen Jennings, author of Finding Soutbek and the overall winner, NoViolet Bulawayo, author of We Need New Names, read from their work.

Kwani? Trust sends off the two Kenyan writers shortlisted for The Caine Prize for African Writing 2014; Billy Kahora and Okwiri Oduor, with readings from their nominated stories ahead of the announcement of the overall winner in Oxford in July.

Live music by KIU

Find more info here

June 21, 2014 at 4:42 pm 2 comments

BIEA Seminar: Rain, Power, Sovereignty & The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe, Apr. 16 2014 @ BIEA / IFRA

Rain, Power, Sovereignty and The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe

Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Time: 11.00 am
Entry: Prior RSVP. For more information please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or call +254 735 260 004

Seminar by: Joost Fontein, University of Edinburgh
Chair: Sinoxolo Neo Musangi, British Institute in Eastern Africa

Abstract
In 2010 a government meteorologist revealed that for much of the last decade, the Zimbabwean weather forecast had been censored on a daily basis by agents of the President’s Office. ‘This information’ he said ‘was seen as sensitive’. What this ‘sensitivity’ amounts to is the subject of this paper. It is hard to make sense of the government’s impulse to censor the weather forecast in the 2000s without reference to the localized re-configurations of authority over land and ‘re-making’ of the state that fast track land reform provoked. To the extent that fast track offered new opportunities for the realization of a diversity of localised aspirations and imagined futures that turned on access to land and fertile soils in divergent ways, the recurrent droughts and failing harvests of the early 2000s were politically significant because they called into question the legitimacy of land reform, and the broader ‘thirdchimurenga’ project constituted around it. But across Zimbabwe, and the region, rainfall and drought have long been measures of contested political legitimacy in more complex ways not limited to the politics of food, famine and agricultural production. In southern Zimbabwe, this is true not just for spirit mediums, chiefs and other ‘traditionalist’ authorities for whom rainmaking practices are well-established means of demonstrating ‘autochthony’, sovereignty and legitimacy, but also for war veterans, new farmers, government technocrats and others involved in land reform during the 2000s. This is what I examine here. Whilst I focus particularly on rainmaking practices, encounters with njuzu water spirits, and national biras that took place in the 2005-6 when research was carried out, the larger point I pursue is that water acts as an index of power – of the entangled but contested play of legitimacy and sovereignty – across many different registers of meaning and regimes of rule. In making this argument I engage with Keane (2003; 2005) and Engelke’s elaboration of Peirce’s theory of signs (1955), and build upon others (James 1972; Jedrej 1992) who have long argued that rainmaking ‘traditions’ across eastern, central and southern Africa are less a form of applied meteorology and more an idiom of politics and power, in order to argue that they are necessarily both at the same time.

April 12, 2014 at 2:42 pm Leave a comment

Exhibition: Témoin/Witness, Dec. 13 2013 – Jan. 10 2014 @ Goethe Institut

witness
Opening Date: Friday, December 13 2013, 7 pm

Exhibition Dates: Monday to Friday, December 16-20 2013, January 2-10 2014,
Time: 1 to 6 pm
Entry: Free

Témoin/Witness is an exhibition initiated by the Goethe- Institut South Africa and curator Simon Njami; co-curated by Sammy Baloji and Monique Pelser. It showcases the works of photographers who were involved in a Photographers’ Portfolio Meeting over a span of three years. The aim was to present their work within the portfolio reviews to several curators to gain critical feedback. The photographers included Sammy Baloji (DRC), Calvin Dondo (Zimbabwe), Sabelo Mlangeni (South Africa), Abraham Oghobase (Nigeria), Monique Pelser (South Africa) and Michael Tsegaye (Ethiopia).

The exhibition speaks about the social issues, ever-changing past and present and inherited cultures across the African continent. It represents how this group of emerging photographers perform the role of onlookers, and actively survey their immedate environments. The works then become historical records and evidence reflecting the constantly shifting history, inherit cultures and social issues that span across the African continent.

About the Photographers

Sammy Baloji
Sammy Baloji, born 1978 in Lubumbashi, D.R.C, lives and works in Lubumbashi and Brussels, Belgium.

“My work questions the still existing traces of colonization in Congolese society. In this approach, it expresses a desire to inform and rewrite a story from the present. A present aware of his past and ready to assume the future. My photographic work is between documentary and fiction. In this sense I need a context (the environment) to create my own story. To do this, I did some research on topics or events of the past and even on the present. I’m using pictures archives or even sound archives to create a new statement.”

Calvin Dondo
Calvin Dondo, born 1963 in Harare, lives and works in Harare, Zimbabwe.

“I believe our work as an artist is to open doors, shed light and give new possibilities to, first, our immediate environment, and then, the world at large. Our visual statements provoke and shift societies understanding of the world. Whatever work I do I feel I am responsible to everyone around me.”

Sabelo Mlangeni
Sabelo Mlangeni, born 1980 in Driefontein, lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa.

“My work challenges a viewer, like in this body of work ‘Country Girls’. In our society we are taught that a man should present himself in a certain way, seeing a man in a dress shifts the way we think and are taught to think. It is political and confronts issues of homophobia.”

Abraham Oghobase
Abraham Oghobase, born 1979 in Lagos, lives and works in Lagos, Nigeria.

“The social, political and economic situation of society plays a pivotal role in my work. I am interested in using photography to explore the way people live and how they are affected by the different systems that exist, and how conditions evolve to meet or take advantage of certain needs. For example, with this series ‘Jam I’ explore how rural-urban drift, among other things, has led to inflated rents in Lagos and congested living spaces. My exploration of identity through self-portraiture in Nigeria and abroad, for example, is often a function of how I am perceived as a photographer, an artist, a black male, a Nigerian, and so on, which in turn is based on social and cultural points of view that have their roots in history.”

Monique Pelser
Monique Pelser, born 1976 in Johannesburg, lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

“I try to use the camera and developing photographic technology as a way of re-looking at my country, the land, people and the objects or traces which were left behind and have become a historical burden. I feel that my generation and those that follow have inherited a lot to process. I try to use photography as dissonance, as a way to re-look and represent and process this history.”

Michael Tsegaye
Michael Tsegaye, born 1975 in Addis Ababa, lives and works in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“In the past ten years, the city in which I live, Addis Ababa, and the rest of Ethiopia has gone through tremendous changes – both demographically as well as physically – with the construction of new buildings and the demolition of the old ones. The changes that modernity has brought about in the rural areas are also quite significant, as old cultural practices adopt certain aspects of new ones.”

December 11, 2013 at 9:37 am Leave a comment

Comedy Night: Africa’s Kings of Comedy, Oct. 26 2013 @ KICC

Africa's Kings of Comedy
Date: October 26, 2013
Venue: KICC
Time: 6 pm
Entry: Kshs 1000 & VIP Kshs 2000

Acts from: Mandy from Nigeria, Kagiso Lediga from South Africa, Patric Salvador from Uganda, Carl Joshua from Zimbabwe and Eric Omondi from Kenya

October 23, 2013 at 10:57 am 1 comment

Nairobi Live ft. Queen Mashie, Aug. 15 2013 @ Tree House

queen_poster_jpeg
Date: August 15, 2013
Venue: Tree House, Museum Hill
Time: 8.30-11 pm
Entrance is free!

Performance by Queen Mashie

About

Sandra Mashiringo a.k.a Queen Mashie was born on March 10 1982,in Gutu, Masvingo, Zimbabwe. She started singing early in class four as a member of the school choir but her progression was interrupted when she joined high school that had no music teacher. She joined the catholic church choir, instead, where she excelled and represented in music competition.

After high school she moved to Harare to join her elder brother and accomplished musician ,Andy Brown, who convinced her to ditch the computer studies she had gone to pursue for a career in music because he thought she had a talent from hearing her singing around the house and in 2002 she joined Andy Brown and Storm band where she got her musical experience. She later joined the Vintage Band as a lead singer with that veteran guitarist Mdhara Timi Makaya.

In 2006 she moved to Nairobi Kenya to pursue her musical career. She worked with Nyota Safi Band and later joined The Tutu Band and was signed with Sound Africa and recorded her first album Kare Kare (long time ago). She did collaborations with different artists from Kenya and Zimbabwe, and produce her second album CD/DVD Queen Mashie Collaboration.

Queen Mashie also performed at the Sauti Za Busara Festival 2008 with Afrodynamics ,a composite of various musicians from different parts of the world (France, Mozambique, Senegal, Austria and Zimbabwe) With the influence from Chiwoniso (mbira maestro),Queen Mashie started playing mbira (the traditional instrument widely played in Zimbabwe, Congo (known as Likembe and other African counties) in 2008.

She composed and recorded her first mbira song on Kare Kare album and on her upcoming album Mbijana Mbijana.

August 10, 2013 at 5:40 pm Leave a comment

Writing Workshop by Kwani Trust, Granta & British Council, Jun. 19-21 2013 @ British Council Kenya

British Council Kenya
BC Nairobi will host a literary week and fiction writers workshop

Dates: June 19, 2013 to June 23, 2013
Venue: BC Nairobi
For more info visit: Kwani?

Kwani Trust and British Council Kenya will collaborate with Granta UK to host a week of literary events in Nairobi between 19th-23rd June 2013. The joint literary programming week will include a launch of the latest Granta issue, ‘Best of Young British Novelists 4’; a three-day fiction-writing workshop; a lecture by the visiting writers from Granta, UK-based Somali Writer, Nadifa Mohamed and British Writer Adam Foulds, at Daystar University; and a 2013 elections evening symposium based on related work by Kwani Trust.

15 selected emerging Kenyan writers will join visiting writers from Uganda, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Malawi and Nigeria for the workshop and other literary events.

Regional British Council offices have partnered with literary organisations from South Africa, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Nigeria and Uganda to select a writer from each of the countries to attend the fiction workshop, along with a corresponding Literature Programmers’ workshop with participants from the countries above.

June 11, 2013 at 9:56 am Leave a comment

Blankets & Wine XLIII, April 7 2013 @ the Carnivore Grounds

Blankets & Wine
Date: April 7, 2013
Location: Carnivore
Gates open: 1 pm
Price: Kshs 2000

March 27, 2013 at 8:43 pm Leave a comment

Out of Town: 10th Sauti za Busara Festival, Feb. 14-17 2013 @ Old Fort in Zanzibar

Sauti za Busara
Dates: February 14-17, 2013
Venue: Old Fort in Zanzibar
Festival Tickets*: EA Residents US $29, International Visitors US $109
Programme: Festival Timetable

*Festival admission prices vary with citizeship. Find full info here

The Festival
The festival will celebrate a lifetime achievement of bringing together artists and audiences from around Africa and beyond with enriching cultural experiences, promoting cultural diversity and social development for the past 10 years.
Sauti za Busara is an annual music event in East Africa and widely known as ‘the friendliest festival on the planet’. This edition will feature 200 musicians: more than twenty five groups from East Africa and beyond; acoustic and electric, upcoming and established – all performing live.

The Old Fort will host three nights of non-stop live music, with the main programme continuing Friday through Sunday with performances from 5pm until 1am.

The festival also features African Music Films: documentaries, music videos and live concert footage, all focused on promoting the richness and diversity of African music as screened in the amphitheatre of the Old Fort.

Headline Artist Cheikh Lo – Senegal
Headline artist for the 10th edition of Sauti za Busara is internationally acclaimed Baye Fall artist Cheikh Lo from Senegal. A superb singer and songwriter as well as a distinctive guitarist, percussionist and drummer he has personalized and distilled a variety of influences from West and Central Africa, to create a style that is uniquely his own.

To celebrate ten years of Sauti za Busara, the festival showcases “Best of the Best”; audience favourites of past years including Tanzania’s DDC Mlimani Park Orchestra.

Zanzibar’s Culture Musical Club will also showcase at the 10th edition and they remain the most prolific and successful taarab orchestra from East Africa.

Other main acts include Khaira Arby (Mali), Comrade Fatso and Chabvondoka (Zimbabwe), Atongo Zimba (Ghana), N’Faly Kouyaté (Guinea), Nathalie Natiembe (Reunion), Nawal & Les Femmes de la Lune (Comoros/Mayotte), Wazimbo (Mozambique), The Moreira Project (Mozambique/South Africa), Owiny Sigoma Band (Kenya/UK), Mokoomba (Zimbabwe), Msafiri Zawose & Sauti Band (Tanzania), Mani Martin (Rwanda), Burkina Electric (Burkina Faso/USA), Lumumba Theatre Group (Tanzania), Sousou & Maher Cissoko (Senegal/Sweden), Super Maya Baikoko (Tanzania), Peter Msechu (Tanzania) and many more.

Networking Space
Sauti za Busara will continue to host the Movers & Shakers networking forum for local and visiting arts professionals. This networking space facilitates discussions, exchange and development of ideas on the creative industries in the East African region and beyond.

Fringe Events
It’s not just the festival that puts on a show; the local community is encouraged to take part by hosting Busara Xtra fringe events. These include traditional ngoma drum and dance, fashion shows, dhow races, open-mic sessions, after-parties and performances of Zanzibar’s oldest taarab orchestras as arranged by the local community.

For More Information: www.busaramusic.org

January 19, 2013 at 2:31 pm 2 comments


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