Posts tagged ‘The British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)’

Seminar: Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom to Govern in the UK, Jun. 11 2014 @ BIEA/IFRA

Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom To Govern In The UK – By Professor Sir Jeffrey Jowell KCMG QC Director, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law

Date: June 11, 2014
Venue: BIEA/IFRA
Entry: Prior Reservation [RSVP on seminars@biea.ac.uk]

About

Sir Jeffrey Jowell QC is Professor of Law and was the Dean of UCL’s Faculty of Laws and Head of its Law Department between 1998-2000 and again from 1982-1989. From 1994 to 1999 he was Vice Provost of UCL. He was was knighted in 2011 (KCMG) for services to human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe.

The scope of Professor Jowell’s work includes judicial review, human rights and planning. He advises extensively on the drafting of national constitutions, the relationship between the UK and dependent territories, and the design and application of internal regulatory and Ombudsmen schemes. His authority as an academic commentator is reflected in many citations to his work in the judgements of courts in this country and abroad.

June 7, 2014 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

Nairobi Forum: LAPSSET – A Transformative Project or a Pipe Dream? – Oct. 4 2013 @ BIEA

LAPSSET: A Transformative Project or a Pipe Dream?

Date: October 4, 2013
Venue: Seminar Room, The British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA), Kileleshwa
Time: 2-5 pm
Entrance is by prior registration only. Register here.

Context
The Lamu Port-South Sudan Transport Corridor (LAPSSET) is an extremely ambitious project. There are multiple elements rolled up in this project: the development of a new port at Lamu; an oil pipeline from that port to South Sudan; road and railway links; and a possible line to southern Ethiopia. There are also plans for a new international airport and new ‘resort cities’ along the line of the rail. The completion of any one of these elements would have a significant impact; in combination they might transform the region.

Each one of the multiple elements of the scheme carries a significant price tag, and LAPSSET has been derided by some observers as more of a pipe dream than a pipeline. Others have drawn attention to other kinds of cost, arguing that the project will have negative consequences for environments and communities, from Lamu itself to the many pastoralist groups who live along the planned line of the project. Political volatility in the region, especially in Somalia, is also a challenge. Yet the project evidently also has the potential to promote regional trade and boost national economies, overcoming the limitations of a transport network whose basic architecture is still that laid down in the early years of colonial rule.

The Nairobi Forum of the Rift Valley Institute (RVI) is organising a public meeting on the LAPSSET that will discuss the opportunities and challenges that this major project will have on individual member states and the wider region. Speakers and participants will be drawn from the government, academia, donors, researchers and the affected communities.

Discussants
Chair: Prof. Justin Willis, University of Durham

Panellists: Mr Silvester Kasuku – CEO LAPSSET, Mr Jonathan Lodompui -Director Vision 2030, Ms Shakila Abdalla MP Lamu East, Mr Abdikadir Omar MP Balambala, Garissa, Dr Ekuru Aukot – Lawyer & Chief Spokesperson, G47

Useful link
Lapsset Tracker: http://lapssettracker.blogspot.com/

October 1, 2013 at 11:33 am Leave a comment


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