Posts tagged ‘nairobi national museum’

Hadithi – An Evening of Music, Spoken Word & Hip Hop Music, Aug. 29 2014 @ National Museum of Kenya

hadithi poster
Date: August 29, 2014
Venue: Amphitheatre, National Museum
Time: 7-9 pm
Entry KES 500 at the gate

Hadithi will feature performances in spoken word, prose and poetry which will be based on Kenya’s sociopolitical realities. The event is held under the auspices of the Samosa Festival. Stand up Shout Out and Zamaleo Act will reflect the festival’s theme – Mitazamo yetu: Kenyan Perspectives – through their performances.

Performances will be done by Nairobi’s premier poets and story-tellers such as Nuru Bahati, Dorphan Mutuma and Msooh Gittau. With the Stand Up Shout Out Team performing a Skit called Stories of a Nation (Hadithi Za Nchi) written and acted by the Stand Up – SHOUT OUT members; the SUSONIANS!

August 27, 2014 at 8:53 am Leave a comment

Nairobi Forum: Our Collective Security – Writers in Conversation, Jun. 28 2014 @ National Museum

Date: Saturday, 28 June 2014
Venue: Louis Leakey Auditorium, Nairobi National Museum
Time: 5pm – 9pm
Entry: Prior Reservation.
RSVP here

The killings in Mpeketoni on 15 and 16 June are the latest in a series of violent events that are challenging the security of Kenya and the East Africa region more broadly. The words ‘terrorism’, ‘assassinations’, ‘tribal clashes’, ‘violent crime’, ‘domestic violence’ regularly appear in mainstream and social media headlines. Traumatic pictures of the aftermath fill the newspapers and TV screens. Kenya is no stranger to violent conflict, as the 2008 post-election violence attests to, but some analysts see the current resurgence as something new. There is no shortage of views on the causes of the current insecurity. Some blame external threats, religious ideology, identity, resource competition, youth unemployment, marginalisation, political intrigue, corruption and inefficiency of the security services. Others point to a failure of collective responsibility.

In the latest in a series of conversations with well-known writers, Kwani Trust, in partnership with the Rift Valley Institute’s Nairobi Forum, have invited a panel of writers to discuss these pressing matters. The writers include:

NoViolet Bulawayo, Writer
Parselelo Kantai, Writer
Rashid Abdi, Journalist
Billy Kahora, Writer and Kwani? managing editor

This conversation follows a session at 5pm at the same venue titled, Meet the Writers, featuring the three shortlisted writers of the Etisalat Prize for Literature, Africa’s most prestigious literary prize: NoViolet Bulawayo (Zimbabwe), Yewande Omotoso (Nigeria/South Africa) and Karen Jennings (South Africa).

June 24, 2014 at 4:38 pm Leave a comment

Exhibition: The Return of Joy Adamson, May 19 – June 30 2015 @ Nairobi National Museum

Joy Adamson painting a portrait of a Masai woman in Kenya, 1960 | Credit: Kenneth Rittener—Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Joy Adamson painting a portrait of a Masai woman in Kenya, 1960 | Credit: Kenneth Rittener—Hulton Archive/Getty Images


Dates: May 19-June 30 2014
Venue: National Museum of Kenya
Entry: Museum Rates Apply

The legacy ofJoy Adamson Exhibition reflects on the contribution of Joy Adamson in the conservation of Kenya’s natural and cultural heritage. The exhibition chronicles the work that won Joy international acclaim as an illustrator, conservationist and author.

Joy Adamson was a colourful, if at times controversial, character whose work continues to affect how people view conservation. Much of her work is immortalized, not only in her illustrations, but in books and film that have been pivotal in preserving the diversity and richness of Kenya’s people and nature.

This exhibition showcasing copies of Joy Adamson’s watercolour painting is a celebration, not only the illustrator and conservationist herself, but also of the diversity and robustness of Kenya’s culture and natural environment.

May 17, 2014 at 3:56 pm Leave a comment

Doodle 4 Google: An Exhibition of Top 100 Doodles, May 5-31 2014 @ Nairobi National Museum

Doodle for Google

Doodle for Google

“To the young people I say, you are a gift to your communities and indeed the world. You are our hope and our future.”
-Wangari Maathai

Doodle 4 Google Art Exhibition Kenya: Through the Eyes of a Child

Dates: May 5-31, 2014
Venue: Aga Khan Hall, Nairobi National Museum

Featuring the top 100 doodles!

May 17, 2014 at 1:27 pm Leave a comment

2nd Nairobi Cultural Festival: Different Colours One People – Visit Emb. Of Mexico Stand, May 10 2014 @ National Museum

Diapositiva1
This will be the Second Nairobi Cultural Festival in which the following countries alongside Mexico will showcase their cultural expressions and sell typical food and drinks: Switzerland, Germany, Finland, Mexico, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Japan, Botswana, Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya.

There will also be a Children’s Corner, where for a small fee kids can have tattoos and face painting done, do their own paintings and play under supervision.

Date: Saturday May 10, 2014
Venue: National Museum Grounds
The event starts at 10 am and goes up to 5 pm.
Entrance is free.

Day of Cultural Expression is organised by the Research Institute of Swahili Studies of Eastern Africa (RISSEA) that is part of the National Museums of Kenya.

May 7, 2014 at 9:08 am 2 comments

Exhibition: Where he ran, and returned to by Clinton Kirkpatrick, May 3-31 2014 @ Creativity Gallery – Nairobi National Museum

Ghost in a crowd, 2014, Oil on canvas, 100cm x 150cm by Clinton Kirkpatrick

Ghost in a crowd, 2014, Oil on canvas, 100cm x 150cm by Clinton Kirkpatrick


Opening: May 3, 2014 at 2 pm
Venue: Creativity Gallery – Nairobi National Museum

Exhibition Dates; May 3 – 31, 2014
Entry: Museum Rates Apply

Website: http://www.clintonkirkpatrick.com/

April 28, 2014 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

Angolan artist Waldermar Bastos Live in Nairobi, Feb. 19 2014 @ the Louis Leakey Auditorium – National Museum

Final poster Waldemar Bastos
Roots International is proud to present world renowned artist Waldemar Bastos from Angola on stage at the Louis Leakey Auditorium at the Nairobi National Museum on Wednesday, February 19 2014.

About
Waldemar Bastos was born near the border with Zaire in N’Banza Congo, a little town which was the first capital city of the ancient kingdom of Angola. He started singing at a very early age. “One day, my father arrived home and found me playing his concertina. In the following Christmas he gave me an accordion as a gift…” From then on, a young Waldemar dedicated his heart and soul to music. Since money was scarce, the little kid chose music lessons over the possibility of getting a bicycle. “For many years, since I was a kid, I was in various bands, and travelled throughout Angola playing all kinds of music: pop, rock, blues, tangos, waltzes. My music is defined by my own life experiences, praise for Angolan identity, and a call for universal brotherhood. It is gratifying for me to hear critics say, as it recently happened in the USA, that my music is universal. That it is not a regional music, but instead for people everywhere.”

In the meantime, Angola won its independence and followed the long socialist road. Bastos went to Portugal and later to Berlin and from there to Brazil, where he became acquainted with some well known musicians, such as Chico Buarque, João do Vale, Elba Ramalho, Djavan and Clara Nunes who had been in Angola in the late seventies. Waldemar finds EMI-Odeon, and records his first album, “Estamos Juntos”. He recorded his second album, the highly praised “Angola Minha Namorada”, five years later. In 1990 he visited Angola, and did a concert in front of 200.00 people in Luanda. While travelling through Lisbon, David Byrne, the mastermind of Luaka Bop record label, and ex-leader of the “Talking Heads”, bought, by chance, a record of the Angolan singer in a downtown Lisbon shop.

Soon after that Waldemar would be featured in the album “Afropea – Telling Stories to the Sea”, an anthology of Lusophone artists issued by Luaka Bop. Afterwards there was “Pretaluz/Blacklight”, recorded in NYC, produced by Arto Lindsay, and issued by Luaka Bop. The New York Times described it as “one of the best World music records of the decade”.

In the aftermath of “Pretaluz/Blacklight”, Waldemar won the “Award for the Emerging Artist of the Year (1999)”. In 1998, Waldemar was discovered by the European audience and media. After his successful tours in Europe as the opening act at the UNESCO Festival “Don’t forget Africa“ in June 2000 in the Canary Islands. Later in the year he was invited by Mr. Ruichi Sakamoto to take part in the “Zero-Landmine” project in cooperation with international artists like Arto Lindsay, Brian Eno, David Sylvian, Jacques Morelenbaum.

Bastos is included in Tom Moon’s legendary book “1000 recordings to hear before you die”, and three of his compositions were featured in the Hollywood movie The Sweepers . He received several invitations by Prince Ernst August von Hanover and Princess Caroline von Hanover in the course of which he also gave a private concert for Rainier III. Another highlight was the “Bal de Roses” in Monaco in 2004.

Classics of my Soul, is his latest production, recorded in Los Angeles and London, produced by Derek Nakamoto and it features his light hearted music full of optimism and joy.

You can find out more about this legendary Angolan artist on his website

This concert has been made possible through the support of Nairobi Java House, Hotel Emerald in Westlands, and the Lusophone Film Fest Nairobi.

February 12, 2014 at 3:06 pm Leave a comment

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