Posts tagged ‘BIEA’

Seminar: Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom to Govern in the UK, Jun. 11 2014 @ BIEA/IFRA

Creative Tension? Administrative Justice vs Freedom To Govern In The UK – By Professor Sir Jeffrey Jowell KCMG QC Director, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law

Date: June 11, 2014
Venue: BIEA/IFRA
Entry: Prior Reservation [RSVP on seminars@biea.ac.uk]

About

Sir Jeffrey Jowell QC is Professor of Law and was the Dean of UCL’s Faculty of Laws and Head of its Law Department between 1998-2000 and again from 1982-1989. From 1994 to 1999 he was Vice Provost of UCL. He was was knighted in 2011 (KCMG) for services to human rights, democracy and the rule of law in Europe.

The scope of Professor Jowell’s work includes judicial review, human rights and planning. He advises extensively on the drafting of national constitutions, the relationship between the UK and dependent territories, and the design and application of internal regulatory and Ombudsmen schemes. His authority as an academic commentator is reflected in many citations to his work in the judgements of courts in this country and abroad.

June 7, 2014 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

RWANDA UNDER THE RPF: Assessing Twenty Years of Post-Conflict Governance, May 30 2014 @ IFRA/BIEA

Rwanda
Date & Time: Friday, 30th May 2014, 6.00PM – 7.30PM
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi

Panel discussion and journal special issue launch.

Speakers
1. Jason Mosley (Research associate, African Studies Centre, University of Oxford, and managing editor, Journal of Eastern African Studies)
2. Phil Clark (Reader in comparative and international politics, SOAS, University of London)
3. Yolande Bouka (Researcher, Conflict Prevention and Risk Analysis Division, ISS Nairobi)

This panel discussion – which serves also as a launch of a special issue of the Journal of Eastern African Studies (JEAS) on the same topic – will debate the nature of Rwandan politics under the RPF and its impact on the post-genocide reconstruction process, regional relations and the well-being of everyday Rwandans.

For more information on the event, please click this link.

PS: Remember to RSVP by sending an email to seminars@biea.ac.uk

May 28, 2014 at 11:24 am Leave a comment

BIEA Seminar: Rain, Power, Sovereignty & The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe, Apr. 16 2014 @ BIEA / IFRA

Rain, Power, Sovereignty and The Materiality Of Signs In Southern Zimbabwe

Date: Wednesday 16th April 2014
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Time: 11.00 am
Entry: Prior RSVP. For more information please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or call +254 735 260 004

Seminar by: Joost Fontein, University of Edinburgh
Chair: Sinoxolo Neo Musangi, British Institute in Eastern Africa

Abstract
In 2010 a government meteorologist revealed that for much of the last decade, the Zimbabwean weather forecast had been censored on a daily basis by agents of the President’s Office. ‘This information’ he said ‘was seen as sensitive’. What this ‘sensitivity’ amounts to is the subject of this paper. It is hard to make sense of the government’s impulse to censor the weather forecast in the 2000s without reference to the localized re-configurations of authority over land and ‘re-making’ of the state that fast track land reform provoked. To the extent that fast track offered new opportunities for the realization of a diversity of localised aspirations and imagined futures that turned on access to land and fertile soils in divergent ways, the recurrent droughts and failing harvests of the early 2000s were politically significant because they called into question the legitimacy of land reform, and the broader ‘thirdchimurenga’ project constituted around it. But across Zimbabwe, and the region, rainfall and drought have long been measures of contested political legitimacy in more complex ways not limited to the politics of food, famine and agricultural production. In southern Zimbabwe, this is true not just for spirit mediums, chiefs and other ‘traditionalist’ authorities for whom rainmaking practices are well-established means of demonstrating ‘autochthony’, sovereignty and legitimacy, but also for war veterans, new farmers, government technocrats and others involved in land reform during the 2000s. This is what I examine here. Whilst I focus particularly on rainmaking practices, encounters with njuzu water spirits, and national biras that took place in the 2005-6 when research was carried out, the larger point I pursue is that water acts as an index of power – of the entangled but contested play of legitimacy and sovereignty – across many different registers of meaning and regimes of rule. In making this argument I engage with Keane (2003; 2005) and Engelke’s elaboration of Peirce’s theory of signs (1955), and build upon others (James 1972; Jedrej 1992) who have long argued that rainmaking ‘traditions’ across eastern, central and southern Africa are less a form of applied meteorology and more an idiom of politics and power, in order to argue that they are necessarily both at the same time.

April 12, 2014 at 2:42 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Digital Kitambo—Taking the Past into the Future, Jan. 30 2014 @ the National Museum

The BIEA in Collaboration with The National Museums Of Kenya Joint Seminar: Digital Kitambo—Taking the Past into the Future at the National Museum with Dr. David K. Wright and Kristina Dziedzic Wright.

Chair: Dr. Edward Pollard, British Institute in Eastern Africa

Date: Thursday, 30 January 2014
Time: 02.00 pm
Venue: The National Museums of Kenya, Nairobi

Abstract
Lake Turkana has long been recognized as a critical incubator of human cultural evolution. Although much attention has justifiably been placed on researching the nature of our early hominin ancestors, the region also hosts a rich record of fishing and early cattle herding cultures as well. Due to the long and storied traditions of archaeological research near Lake Turkana, a rich collection has been accumulated in the Nairobi National Museum. However, legacy archives need to be digitally curated and integrated into computer databases as the pace of archaeological research in Kenya accelerates. The “Digital Kitambo” project has begun developing an integrated archaeological database using early food producers of northern Kenya to develop the template for future digitization efforts within the museum. The project involves conversion of analogue collections into a relational database, photographing archaeological artifacts and creating 3-dimensional scans of selected artifacts. The Nairobi National Museum hosts one of the deepest records of the human past in the world, but will lead the way into the future in access and usability of collections databases.

Dr. David K. Wright
David K. Wright is Assistant Professor of African Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology and Art History at Seoul National University in South Korea. Dr. Wright is a geoarchaeologist with specialties in human-environment interactions, sedimentology, evolutionary archaeology and prehistoric African cultures. He has conducted research in eastern Africa and the American Midwest, Plains, and Southwest. He is co-PI on the Malawi Early and Middle Stone Age Project (MEMSAP) studying the behavioral transitions in hominids and early modern humans in northern Malawi. Dr. Wright also conducts research near Lake Turkana, Kenya and in the Mandera Mountains, Cameroon on human adaptations to Holocene environmental change and is the lead PI on a project in the middle Gila River Valley, Arizona called “The Archaeology of Dust.”

Kristina Dziedzic Wright
Kristina Dziedzic Wright teaches art history and writing at Seoul National University in South Korea, and works as a freelance curator. She is the author of Art, Culture, and Tourism on an Indian Ocean Island: An Ethnographic Study of Jua Kali Artists in Lamu, Kenya (2009) and recently co-curated the exhibit Sanaa ya Makaratasi (African Paper Art): Process, Substance and Environment at the Nairobi National Museum. Her academic research ranges from informal sector art and cultural commoditization in Africa to media art and the international biennale phenomenon. Over the last ten years, she has participated in a number of archival and digitization projects for the University of Illinois at Chicago, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum and the Elgin Cultural Arts Commission in Illinois, USA

For more information please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or call +254 20 815 5186

January 24, 2014 at 11:44 am Leave a comment

Book Launch: A Renegade Called Simphiwe by Prof. Pumla Dineo Gqola, Sept. 13 2013 @ BIEA

Date: Friday September 13, 2013
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 10.30 am
Entry: Free

For more information and to RSVP please contact seminars@biea.ac.uk or Sinoxolo Neo Musangi at neo.musangi@biea.ac.uk

There is an idealised model of (Black) femininity in post-apartheid South Africa.
On the surface, she embodies the transformational promise of a new South Africa: a radical departure from apartheid stereotypes, she is an articulate, independent, ambitious woman with increasing control over her public and financial life. However, closer analysis of this model femininity, “the new South African woman”, reveals much about the workings of white supremacist heteropatriachal capitalist control and policing of women in contemporary South Africa. Building on the illustration and analysis of this woman, the paper will make an argument for urgent need to amplify the place of renegades in post-apartheid South Africa, using a few examples, including those discussed in this book – A Renegade Called Simiphiwe.

About
Prof. Pumla Dineo Gqola is Associate Professor of African Literary and Gender studies at the University of the Witwatersrand. She is author of What is slavery to me? Postcolonial/Slave memory in post-apartheid South Africa (Wits Press, 2010) and A renegade called Simphiwe (MFBooks Joburg/Jacana, 2013).

Her research and teaching is on African feminisms and sexualities, slave memory in African and diasporic literatures and gendered Blackness. She is also editor of Regarding Winnie: feminism, race and nation in global representations of Winnie Madikizela Mandela (forthcoming with Cassava republic).

She holds MA degrees from the Universities of Cape Town (SA) and Warwick (UK) and a DPhil in Postcolonial Studies from the University of Munich, Germany.

September 4, 2013 at 6:34 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Military Interventions in a Post-Colonial World by Sir Adam Roberts, Jan. 8 2013 @ BIEA

Date: January 8, 2013
Venue: British Institute of East Africa
Time: 3 pm
Lecture by: Professor Sir Adam Roberts [President of the British Academy]
To reserve a place email: lecture2013@biea.ac.uk

Lecture to be opened by Dr Ambreena Manji, Director of the BIEA

January 4, 2013 at 9:43 am Leave a comment

Seminar: Collaborative Research on Enslavement for Forced Marriage in War-5 Country Study, Dec. 3 2012 @ BIEA

Presentation by Annie Bunting;


Date: December 3, 2012
Venue: The BIEA
Time: 10.30 am
Entry: Prior RSVP – killian.ngala@biea.ac.uk

About
Annie Bunting is an Associate Professor in the Law & Society program at York University in Toronto, teaching in the areas of social justice and human rights. Professor Bunting is a graduate of York, having studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School (1988). She received her LL.M. from the London School of Economics and Political Science (1991) and her S.J.D. from the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto (1999).

Professor Bunting is currently directing a SSHRC-funded international research partnership on forced marriage in conflict situations with historians of slavery and women’s human rights scholars (2010-14). She has published articles in Social and Legal Studies, Journal of Law and Society, Canadian Journal of Women & the Law, and chapters in various book collections. She is on the Editorial Board of Law & Social Inquiry and the Muslim World Journal of Human Rights.

This event will take place on Monday 3rd December 2012 at 10.30AM at The British Institute in Eastern Africa, Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, NAIROBI. Kindly RSVP by sending an email to killian.ngala@biea.ac.uk

November 29, 2012 at 6:50 pm Leave a comment

Book Launch: South Sudan – from revolution to independence, Oct. 19 2012 @ British Institute In Eastern Africa


Date: Friday October 19th, 2012
Venue: at the British Institute In Eastern Africa
Location: Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa.
Time: 6-8 pm
Entry: Prior Reservation [seminars@biea.ac.uk]

In July 2011 the Republic of South Sudan achieved independence, concluding what had been Africa’s longest running civil war. The process leading to independence was driven by the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement, a primarily Southern rebel force and political movement intent on bringing about the reformed unity of the whole Sudan. A story of transformation and of victory against the odds, this book reviews South Sudan’s modern history as a contested region and assesses the political, social and security dynamics that will shape its immediate future as Africa’s newest independent state.

About the Author
Matthew LeRiche is a Fellow in Managing Humanitarianism at LSE. He will be launching his book in Kenya which will be prefaced by a few words on the importance of South Sudan to both academicians and practitioners followed by an exposition of the book.

An interlocutory session with the audience will follow thereafter and copies of the book will be available for sale.

October 9, 2012 at 10:26 am Leave a comment

Book Launch: Northrup-The Life of William Northup McMillan by Judy Aldrick, Sept. 2 2012 @ BIEA


Northrup, a biography written by Judy Aldrick on the life of Sir William Northrup McMillan, will be launched at British Institute of East Africa

Date: September 2, 2012
Time: 3pm

The author, Judy Aldrick, will give a short talk on how she researched the book accompanied by a slide show of vintage photographs.

Other Events
Book signing session with the author at Bookstop-Yaya Centre
Date: September 1, 2012
Time: 11am-1pm.

Second Official Launch in Mombasa [Authors Home town for 22 Years]
Date: September 4, 2012
Venue: Fort Jesus-Mombasa
Time: 7pm.

*Copies of Northrup will be on sale at each venue for Ksh. 1000/- and the author will be signing books

August 29, 2012 at 4:00 pm Leave a comment

Talk: Violence, Stress & Mortality in Northern Kenya, Aug. 8, 2012 @ BIEA


Date: August 8, 2012
Venue: British Institute of East Africa
Time: 11am-12.30pm
Entry: RSVP seminars@biea.ac.uk

Abstract
The paper reports on a project documenting the embodied impacts of violence in three pastoralist communities chronically at war with one another – the Pokot, Samburu, and Turkana.
Data was collected beginning in November, 2008 and concluding in August, 2011 using a mixed-methods approach that included participant-observation, open-ended interview, survey, health recall, mental health stress screen, and anthropometrics (BMI, skin fold thickness).
The paper will present a portion of the mental health and anthropometric findings in their ethnographic context with discussion focused particularly on the most vulnerable groups by age, gender, and community.
Presenter: Bilinda Straight

Contributors: Bilinda Straight (1) Ivy Pike (2) Charles Hilton (3)

1 Western Michigan University. Kalamazoo, MI
2 University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ
3 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

August 3, 2012 at 5:38 pm 1 comment

Seminar: Domestic Tourism and National Cohesion in Kenya, Jul. 20 2012 @ IFRA/BIEA

Date: July 20, 2012
Venue: IFRA/BIEA conference room
Time: 10am – 1pm
To attend, kindly RSVP to seminars@ifra-nairobi.net

Chair: Prof. Bob Wishitemi, D.V.C. Moi University
Speakers: Prof. Jean Rieucau*, Université Lyon 2 (France) and Dr. Damiannah Kieti, Moi University
This are presentations by PhD candidates followed by English debate

* His presentation will be in French, supported by a powerpoint presentation in English, the debate will be in english

Abstract
Domestic tourism is a growing industry in Kenya (30% of the yearly touristic national takings) and constitutes already the main frequentation of some of the National Parks (53% of the visitors in Nakuru). For Kenyan authorities, domestic tourism seems to be useful as it may facilitate ethnical understanding and develop national pride and cohesion. In the process of selection of national monuments, the National Museums of Kenya have tried to promote the ethno-cultural diversity of the country. This new touristic development strategy of Kenyan institutions questions strongly the social sciences in relation to free time, leisure and touristic mobility of the Sub-Saharan populations.

For full information: http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=15ef751e46901aabe24384368&id=c913d2015f

July 13, 2012 at 12:15 pm 2 comments

Seminar: Mungiki Workshop, Jul. 9 2012 @ BIEA


Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa
Location: Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 8.30am – 12.15pm
Entry: RSVP with seminars@biea.ac.uk

SYNOPSIS
Even after disbanding itself in 2010, the proscribed Mungiki group seemingly remains an important factor in Kenyan society and politics. With regular appearances in the media, with the ICC trials going ahead and the Kenyan elections close on the horizon, this half-day workshop interrogates the role which the Mungiki plays in contemporary Kenya. Building on earlier and on-going research, the workshop assembles prominent Kenyan and international researchers who work on various aspects of the Mungiki.

The workshop is jointly convened by
The British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi
Mutuma Rutere (The Centre for Human Rights and Policy Studies, Nairobi) and
André Sonnichsen (The Centre of African Studies, University of Copenhagen)

* Cartoon by Gado

July 3, 2012 at 11:29 am 1 comment

Conference/Seminar: Citizenship, Belonging & Political Community in Africa, Jul. 11-12 2012 @ BIEA


Dates: July 11-12, 2012
Venue: the British Institute in Eastern Africa
RSVP by contacting Dr Emma Hunter, elh35@cam.ac.uk [Limited places available]

Download the programme herekenya_conf_2012b

June 29, 2012 at 1:52 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: The Earliest Stone Tools: New Discoveries from West Side of Lake Turkana, Jun 19 2012 @ IFRA

June 13, 2012 at 7:41 pm Leave a comment

Seminar/ Politics as Culture in Eastern Africa: Nation-Building, Neo-Liberalism and Moral Rhetoric, Jun. 14 2012 @ BIEA

Date: Thursday 14, June 2012
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA), Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 10.00am – 12.00pm

Politics as Culture in Eastern Africa: Nation-Building, Neo-Liberalism and Moral Rhetoric
This workshop brings together recent studies of the cultural and rhetorical dimensions of contemporary political change in Eastern Africa. The constitution of national identity has long been studied as an inherently cultural exercise. National affiliation is sustained by a range of cultural practices in which citizens actively participate.
While critical studies have concentrated on the developmental state of the post-independence period, less attention has been directed to more recent neo-liberal state formations which have emerged in Africa under pressure from donors and the international financial institutions.

The workshop seeks to explore the dimensions of this new moral culture in the politics of East Africa. It will consider in particular the potential for contest and subversion of the dominant neo-liberal common sense, as well as earlier cultural forms and moral exemplars which are still influential in East African politics.

Papers:
1. Writing ‘Project Kenya’: Public Memory and Popular Histories in Parselelo Kantai’s Writing Grace Musila (University of Stellenbosch)
2. Satire and the Politics of Corruption in Kenya John Harrington and Ambreena Manji (BIEA)
3. Remoralizing Politics in Tanzania: Julius Nyerere as a National Icon Marie-Aude Fouéré (IFRA)

The seminar is free. To RSVP please email – kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk Or call 0724 576600 / 0735 260004

June 12, 2012 at 4:44 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Internationalisation and Higher Education – Perspectives and Challenge, May 29 2012 @ BIEA

The BIEA invites you to their May 2012 seminar titled ‘Internationalisation and Higher Education – Perspectives and Challenges’. The presentation is scheduled for 29 Tuesday, May 2012 at 11.00am to 12.00pm.

The presentation will be given by Professor Nick Foskett, the Vice Chancellor of Keele University, UK. Prior to his appointment at Keele, Professor Foskett had been Dean of the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Professor Nick Foskett academic specialism lies in educational leadership and management, with a particular focus on the interaction of policy and practice. His main research contributions have been in the fields of education markets, student choice, the management of institutional partnerships, and processes of internationalisation, particularly in the 14-19 sector and in universities. He has a long standing interest in curriculum design and development in 14-19 and university sectors and in all of these fields, has provided consultancy to institutions and governments both in the UK and internationally.

Professor Foskett was until recently, the joint editor of the Commonwealth’s journal, International Studies in Educational Administration.

The seminar will be chaired by Dr Ambreena Manji, the Director of the British Institute in Eastern Africa.

Kindly RSVP if you plan on attending by sending an email to kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk

Download programme Tuesday 29 May 2012 Seminar

May 16, 2012 at 9:32 am Leave a comment

Masterclass: Fostering Entrepreneurship- by Prof. Richard Harrison, Apr. 12 2012 @ BIEA


Date: April 12, 2012
Venue: BIEA
Entry: RSVP (020 2613996, 0787608719, 0723110471)
Time: 5pm

Topic: Fostering Entrepreneurship -the role of enterprise in economic development

Facilitator: Prof. Richard Harrison (Professor of Entrepreneurship & Management)

April 12, 2012 at 3:09 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Plots for Sale-The Dynamics of Land Transformation in Periurban Kenya, Mar. 21 2012 @ BIEA /IFRA

Date: March 21, 2012
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room – Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 1.30 – 3.30pm
Entry: RSVP seminars@biea.ac.uk

Presenter: Dr. Patrick Mbataru, Department of Agribusiness Management and Trade, Kenyatta University

This will be followed by a debate on: The Gains and Challenges on Land Reforms in Kenya with Mr. Ibrahim Mwathane (Director of Land Development and Governance Institute)
This discussion will help open latitude for updating knowledge on key achievements and associated challenges to date to the reform.
Chair: Dr. Ambreena Manji, BIEA Director and Prof. Christian Thibon, IFRA Director

Synopsis
Land subdivision is one of the processes whose aim is to release land to the market. It allows development of infrastructure in an area. Formal processing of land subdivision also act as a deterrent to emerging informal land markets which lead to urban sprawls and blights. But the process is informed by many factors, resulting to either efficient or dysfunctional land markets.
The land market in Nairobi is distorted. The accelerated subdivision of hitherto prime agricultural land in a time of key debate on land and in the wake of a new constitution calling for land reforms calls us to interrogate the dynamics of land mutation around the country.

March 14, 2012 at 8:04 am Leave a comment

Seminar: Latest archaeological investigations in the Lower Omo Valley, Feb 9 2012 @ BIEA

The British Institute in East Africa (BIEA) invites you to our upcoming seminar scheduled for 9 Thursday February 2012 at 11.30am-12.30pm. The seminar, based on a collaborative
project between Dr Timothy Clack and Dr Marcus Brittain will focus on the team’s latest archaeological investigations in the Lower Omo Valley.

Dr Clack is a lecturer in archaeology and anthropology at the African Studies Centre at the University of Oxford. His research interests include archaeological mediation, syncretism and religious fusion, anthropology of conflict, as well as memory and cultural landscapes. Dr Brittain, a researcher with the University of Cambridge is interested in the interaction of landscape, memory, and identity within indigenous communities in the UK and in E. Africa. He is also interested in the socio-politics of cultural heritage and archaeological interpretation and is currently in the process of developing a historiography of the role of the archaeological discourse in post conflict situations.

The Lower Omo Valley is well known as a rich resource for anthropological and ecological studies, and of course for its fossilised record of the evolution of hominin species. However, the archaeological potential for exploring the later prehistory of the region has gone unrecognised. It was therefore the focus of the current project, initiated in 2008, to intensively survey an area of the Mursi tribal-ethnic territory in conjunction with a targeted scheme of excavation. The results have been surprising, revealing a unique landscape of megalithic architecture and lithic assemblages, together spanning a time period from the Middle Stone Age to the later Iron Age. This presentation will provide an overview of these results and a preliminary consideration of their implications.

This seminar is FREE and open to all those interested in the topic.
If you plan on attending, please RSVP by emailing office@biea.ac.uk

February 3, 2012 at 12:40 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Crossing Boundaries-Women and the Quest for Space Justice, Jan. 12 2012 @ BIEA

Date: January 12, 2011
Venue: British Institute of Eastern Africa (BIEA)
Time: 3 -4.30pm
Entry: Prior Reservation with Kerry (kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)

This presentation will be given by Dr Mary Njeri Kinyanjui, a senior research fellow at the Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi. Dr Kinyanjui has been a guest scholar at various international institutions such as United Nations Institute for Social Development, Geneva, Switzerland and more recently Nordiska African Institute, Uppsala , Sweden. She is also an established author of books such as Social Capital, Micro and Small Enterprise and Poverty Alleviation and Women, Informal Economy and Urban Dynamism, the latter of which she will be drawing her presentation from.

The seminar will be chaired by Professor Patrick Adero Alila, a research professor and the former director of the Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi (UoN). Besides his teaching and research engagements at UoN, Professor Alila is also a leading specialist in sustainable development and an advisor to the government and the United Nations organisations.

Download the Thurs 12 January 2012 Seminar programme (pdf)

January 7, 2012 at 10:30 am Leave a comment

Seminar: Understanding the Shallowness & Fragility of the Banking Sector in Kenya, Dec. 7 2011 @ BIEA

Date: December 7, 2011
Venue: British Institute of Eastern Africa (BIEA)
Time: 11am -12.30pm
Entry: Prior Reservation with Kerry (kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)

This presentation will be given by Dr Radha Upadhyaya, an economist with extensive teaching experience at the Department of Finance and Management Studies at SOAS, University of London.
In Kenya, Dr Upadhyaya has been involved in policy reform, the restructuring of a failed Kenyan bank, and has also served on the board of the Institute of Economic Affairs.

The seminar will be chaired by Dr Ambreena Manji who is the Director of the British Institute in Eastern Africa.

Download the The Shallowness and Fragility of Kenya’s Banking Sector programme

November 29, 2011 at 5:38 pm Leave a comment

Seminar: Language, Cultural Symbolism, and Values-The Case for an AfroScript, Oct. 28 2011 @ BIEA

The BIEA invites you to a seminar this October on the development of a pan-African writing system. The presentation is scheduled for;

Date: Friday October 28, 2011
Venue: BIEA
Time: 2-3.30pm
Entry: RSVP if you plan to attend (kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)

Titled: Language, Cultural Symbolism, and Values-The Case for an AfroScript

This presentation will be given by Phillip Keane, an international educator and linguist whose research interests into ancient African script led to the development of a proto-type African writing system called the AfroScript – a writing system which can be used to write almost any African language.
Phillip has worked in various parts of East Africa, Europe, the Middle East, as well as the Caribbean.

This session will be chaired by Professor Humphrey Ojwang’. Prof. Humphrey is a lecturer at the Institute of African Studies at the University of Nairobi.

Download the Afroscript Program

October 19, 2011 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

Lecture: Different seas, different histories? Reflections on the western Indian Ocean, Sept. 6 2011 @ BIEA

Date: Tuesday, 6 September 2011
Venue: The British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) seminar room
Location: Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa
Time: 11.00am-12.30pm
Entry: Prior registration
To register email: humphrey.mathenge@biea.ac.uk

Speaker: Prof. John Mack, President of the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)

Chair: Dr. Hassan Wario Arero, Director of Museums, Sites, & Monuments – National Museums of Kenya (NMK)

Abstract: Different seas, different histories? Reflections on the western Indian Ocean
The seminar discusses some of the arguments in the speaker’s recent book The Sea, A Cultural History. It begins by suggesting that seas have different characteristics which need to be taken into account in assessing the human engagement with them. Interpretations based on the Mediterranean or the North Sea have dominated interpretation of wider histories as have terrestrial understandings of what it means to be at sea.
Topics discussed will include navigational practices, conceptions of the sea, trading practices and piracy. The occupation of Madagascar and the Swahili islands is instructive in terms of the implications of moving across the Equator. The mismatch between astrological systems and navigational knowledge, both based on observations of the stars, provides a suggestive conclusion.

Download Map and Directions

August 29, 2011 at 4:36 pm 1 comment

Lecture: the context of primate evolution on Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, Jul. 15 2011 @ BIEA

July 15, 2011
Venue: BIEA seminar room
Time: 11.00am – 12.30pm.
Entry: register with Kerry (kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)

The talk, titled the context of primate evolution on Rusinga and Mfangano Islands, forms part of ongoing research focused on understanding the evolution and adaptations of the earliest fossil apes.

The presentation will be made by Dr Kieran McNulty, an associate anthropology professor at the University of Minnesota and chaired by, Dr Fredrick Manthi, a senior Palaeontologist at the National Museums of Kenya (NMK).

Download further details on the talk. Primate Evolution on Rusinga & Mfangano Islands

July 8, 2011 at 1:28 pm Leave a comment

Update/Seminar: Different Seas, Different Histories? Reflections on the Western Indian Ocean, Jul. 6 2011 @ BIEA

Due to unforeseen and unavoidable circumstances, Professor John Mack has with deep regret had to cancel his trip to Kenya and therefore his Seminar too (Different Seas, Different Histories?), which was scheduled for

Date: July 6, 2011
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) Seminar Room, Laikippia Road, Kileleshwa
Speaker: Prof. John Mack, President of the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)
Chair: Dr. Hassan Wario, Director of Museums, Sites & Monuments-National Museum of Kenya (NMK)
Entry: RSVP with Kerry (Kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)
Tel. Contacts: 0735 260 004 or 0724 576 600

This seminar has been rescheduled to a later date and details will be communicated once we get them. Please accept apologies from BIEA.

The seminar discusses some of the arguments in the speaker’s recent book The Sea, A Cultural History. It begins by suggesting that seas have different characteristics which need to be taken into account in assessing the human engagement with them. Interpretations based on the Mediterranean or the North Sea have dominated interpretation of wider histories as have terrestrial understandings of what it means to be at sea. Topics discussed will include navigational practices, conceptions of the sea, trading practices and piracy. The occupation of Madagascar and the Swahili islands is instructive in terms of the implications of moving across the Equator. The mismatch between astrological systems and navigational knowledge, both based on observations of the stars, provides a suggestive conclusion.

Download Different seas, different histories poster and Map and Directions (pdf)

July 4, 2011 at 8:23 am Leave a comment

Update/Seminar: Different Seas, Different Histories? Reflections on the Western Indian Ocean, Jul. 6 2011 @ BIEA

Due to unforeseen and unavoidable circumstances, Professor John Mack has with deep regret had to cancel his trip to Kenya and therefore his Seminar too (Different Seas, Different Histories?), which was scheduled for

Date: July 6, 2011
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) Seminar Room, Laikippia Road, Kileleshwa
Speaker: Prof. John Mack, President of the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA)
Chair: Dr. Hassan Wario, Director of Museums, Sites & Monuments-National Museum of Kenya (NMK)
Entry: RSVP with Kerry (Kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk)
Tel. Contacts: 0735 260 004 or 0724 576 600

This seminar has been rescheduled to a later date and details will be communicated once we get them. Please accept apologies from BIEA.

The seminar discusses some of the arguments in the speaker’s recent book The Sea, A Cultural History. It begins by suggesting that seas have different characteristics which need to be taken into account in assessing the human engagement with them. Interpretations based on the Mediterranean or the North Sea have dominated interpretation of wider histories as have terrestrial understandings of what it means to be at sea. Topics discussed will include navigational practices, conceptions of the sea, trading practices and piracy. The occupation of Madagascar and the Swahili islands is instructive in terms of the implications of moving across the Equator. The mismatch between astrological systems and navigational knowledge, both based on observations of the stars, provides a suggestive conclusion.

Download Different seas, different histories poster and Map and Directions (pdf)

June 28, 2011 at 8:30 am Leave a comment

Seminar: Kenya’s Water Reform, Jun. 17 2011 @ BIEA

The British Institute in East Africa (BIEA) is organizing a seminar on Water titled ‘Water Reform: Lessons from a hundred years of water politics’.

Date: June 17, 2011
Venue: BIEA Seminar Room.
Location: Kileleshwa on Laikipia road.
Time: 1.30-3.30pm
To attend register with Kerry: kerry.kyaa@biea.ac.uk

The presentation will be given by Dr David Nilsson who has worked extensively for SIDA in East Africa. Currently an independent adviser and researcher attached to the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, Dr Nilson is also a publisher of several articles on the history of public water supply in Kenya and Uganda

The seminar and the ensuing discussion will be chaired by Dr Samuel Owour Ouma, a senior lecturer at the University of Nairobi.

Attached are the programme and Map to the venue. (Pdf)

June 14, 2011 at 11:47 am Leave a comment

Seminar: Constitutions and Constitution Making in E.A. & the Role of Law in Development, Jun. 9-11 2011 @ BIEA

Dates: June 9–11, 2011
Venue: British Institute in Eastern Africa
Location: Laikipia Road, Kileleshwa, Nairobi
Entry: Contact Hannah the workshop coordinator (constitutionworkshop@gmail.com) to register and to get the full programme of the workshop
Contacts: +254 (0) 704 135913 | http://www.biea.ac.uk

Date: June 9, 2011
Topic: Constitutions and Constitution Making in Eastern Africa
Speakers: Willy Mutunga, Yash Pal Ghai, Goran Hyden, Jill Cottrell Ghai, Ambreena Manji, Patrick McAuslan, Linda Musumba, Wanjiku Kabira, Patricia Kameri-Mbote, Ben Sihanya*

Reflecting on the new era of constitution making in East Africa, the Katiba workshop will focus on: the history and legacy of postcolonial constitution making in the East Africa region, the social, political and economic considerations in drafting contemporary constitutions and the problems and challenges of implementing new constitutions.

Dates: June 10-11, 2011
Topic: The Role of Law in Development
Speakers: Vincent Mutai, Jack Mwimali, Luis Franceschi, Edga Sichangi, Hanna Weijers, Kasaija Phillip Apuuli, Reynolds Richter, Joy Malala, Nathan Tuimising, Benjamin Saccaggi, Thomas Obel Hansen, Charles Kamala, Angela Kronenburg*

On June 10-11, 2011, senior scholars from the Katiba workshop will read and comment on papers by early career scholars on a range of topics, including:

- Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and Constitutionalism
- Law and Natural Resources Management
- Intellectual Property and Health Rights
- Law, Banking and Financial Inclusion
- International Criminal Justice in Kenya

Download the Programme 9th – 11th June (pdf)

June 2, 2011 at 9:40 am Leave a comment

Workshop: New Trends in Kenyan Politics? Feb. 8 2011 @ IFRA/BIEA

On the occasion of the venue of Hervé Maupeu and Daniel Bourmaud, French researchers, IFRA and its partners (BIEA, Goethe Institute and NMK) are organising a workshop on the new trends in Kenyan politics. Political decisions that might be described as rather impressive have shaped Kenya’s political landscape during the last months: new constitution; intensified prosecution of key suspects of the 2007-08 post-election violence crisis, such as several political leaders; fearless activities in the fight against corruption carried out by the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission (KACC) under its new director Patrice Lumumba to highlight some. Furthermore, the proximity of upcoming 2012 presidential and parliamentary elections has allowed speculations around new alignments amongst political leaders and formations. In the context of these important political evolutions, academic discussions about according subjects might come at a good time. Five themes could be highlighted:
• The respect of constitutional changes
• The role of religions and the ethics of the religious discourse in politics
• The unofficial electoral campaign and the problem of the renewal of the elite
• The struggle against corruption
• The international pressure on Kenyan politics

Contemporary politics shall be discussed and interpreted in the light of Kenya’s past political evolution, confronting the different perspectives and approaches of historians, political scientists and professional representatives of the civil society. By entering a transition period including elements such as the establishment of a coalition government, a forged anti-corruption discourse and the necessity to imagine a post-Kibaki political era among others, Kenya has a historic opportunity to be at the dawn of either a long-claimed renewal or might see itself confronted to a simple reproduction of its political scene. The future of Kenyan politics is at stake and needs to be assessed in depth to fully understand the trends that are already shaping the next elections.

Date: February 8, 2011
Venue: IFRA/BIEA conference room
Time: 1000-1600hrs
REGISTRATION REQUIRED: Please send an email at publications@ifra-nairobi.net
IFRA_PoliticsWorkshop poster

February 4, 2011 at 2:50 pm Leave a comment


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